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Nigeria: National Assembly legislators are saboteurs — Catholic bishops

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President Muhammadu Buhari, Senate President Ahmad Lawan and Speaker of House of Reps, Femi Gbajabiamila

The National Assembly legislators are saboteurs, say Catholic bishops in Nigeria, accusing them of having “perfected the art of sabotaging” Nigerians’ progress.

Under the Ibadan Ecclesiastical Province, the Catholic clerics advised the federal legislators to prioritise Nigerians’ interests above party and selfish interests.

“With the National Assembly at various occasions prioritising party and privileges over people’s rights and interest, relief and progress continue to elude Nigerians,” said the bishops. “Simply put, those who claim to represent the people seem to have perfected the art of sabotaging the progress of their (sic) same people.”

They urged Nigerians to challenge their representatives “by all legitimate means,” asserting that they must not accept the parliament’s “non-representative decisions.”

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“Indeed, the time may have come for Nigerians to no longer simply roll over and accept non-representative decisions of the assembly, but to challenge them by all legitimate means,” stated the bishops.

The bishops from Ibadan Archdiocese, Ilorin, Ondo, Oyo, Ekiti, and Osogbo Dioceses, said this in a communique after their meeting at the Domus Pacis Pastoral Institute, Igoba, Akure, on Wednesday evening.

The clerics condemned the passage of the amended Electoral Act and the Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) and urged Nigerians to challenge the Senate and the House of Representatives’ decisions.

They appealed to Nigerians not to lose hope in the possibility of a peaceful, united, and prosperous country, urging the media and civil society groups to sustain the momentum on increased public awareness and education on the importance of political participation at all levels of governance.

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“We say stand firm and never lose hope for God cannot be defeated. We call on Nigerians to continue to pray and work for a better nation, for we have no other country than this.

“If we do not give up doing good and believing in God’s promise, we shall see better days…. We also urge our people to register and obtain their voters’ cards; only this grants them the power to exercise their rights to determine who governs them from time to time.

“Our country will greatly benefit from this,” added the Catholic bishops.

Politics

Sudan’s military asks premier to form new government

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Tensions have risen in recent days between military and civilian members of the Sudanese transitional authority over the coup attempt last month.

Military members of Sudan’s ruling Sovereign Council asked Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok to form a new government to solve the marginalization crisis of tribes, local media reported Wednesday.

According to daily al-Sudani, unidentified informed sources said military members from the Council refused on Tuesday to meet a ministerial committee formed by Hamdok to address the crisis in eastern Sudan.

“The military members refused to meet the ministerial committee and asked to meet Hamdok alone before meeting any minister,” said the newspaper.

It also said members representing the army exerted pressure on Hamdok to dissolve the government in response to demands to form a new government by the head of the High Council of Beja, Muhammad al-Amin Turk.

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Tensions have risen in recent days between military and civilian members of the Sudanese transitional authority over the coup attempt last month.

The government has yet to comment on developments mentioned by the newspaper.

The Sudanese Council of Ministers decided Tuesday to form a committee, headed by Hamdok, to engage military members of the Sovereign Council to agree on “practical solutions” to the crisis.

Sudan is ruled by a civilian government and a Sovereign Council which consists of 14 members; five military representatives from the army, six civilians from the Forces for Freedom and Change Coalition and three members who were added in February to represent armed groups after a peace deal was signed with the government in October 2020.

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Demonstrators have since Sept. 17 blocked Khartoum’s airport, seaports and the main road between Khartoum and Port Sudan in protest of the peace deal with rebel groups, which Beja tribes in eastern Sudan say marginalizes the community.

The High Council of Beja Nazir has complained about marginalization in eastern regions and demanded the cancelation of the peace deal and the establishment of a national conference to approve development projects in the regions.

Since Aug. 21, 2019, Sudan has been in a 53-month transitional period that will end with elections in early 2024.

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Guinea coup leader sworn in as transitional leader

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The new interim president spoke of his "commitment" that neither he nor any member of the junta would stand in any future elections that the military have promised to organise after a transition period.

Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, who led last month’s coup in Guinea, was sworn in as interim president on Friday promising to respect all the West African state’s international commitments.

Doumbouya, who led the overthrow of president Alpha Conde on September 5, was sworn in by Supreme Court head Mamadou Sylla for a transition period of unspecified length.

The new interim president spoke of his “commitment” that neither he nor any member of the junta would stand in any future elections that the military have promised to organise after a transition period.

He said nothing at the time of his swearing in, by the supreme court head, about the duration of this transition.

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– ‘Consolidate democracy’ –

Wearing a beige dress uniform, red beret and dark glasses, the new national leader also vowed to “loyally preserve national sovereignty” and to “consolidate democratic achievements, guarantee the independence of the fatherland and the integrity of the national territory”.

The ceremony was held at the Mohammed-V palace in Conakry on the eve of a public holiday celebrating the 1958 declaration of independence from France.

Doumbouya will serve as transitional president until the country returns to civilian rule, according to a blueprint unveiled by the junta on Monday that does not mention a timeline.

The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa’s most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Conde.

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Conde became Guinea’s first democratically elected president in 2010 and was re-elected in 2015.

But last year he pushed through a controversial new constitution that allowed him to run for a third term in October 2020.

The move sparked mass demonstrations in which dozens of protesters were killed. Conde won re-election but the political opposition maintained the poll was a sham.

The “charter” unveiled on Monday vows that a new constitution will be drafted and “free, democratic and transparent” elections held, but does not spell out how long the transition will last.

The document says the transitional president will be “head of state and supreme chief of the armed forces… (and) determines the policies of the Nation,” with the power to name and fire an interim prime minister.

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However, the president will be barred from being a candidate at the elections that will take place after the transition, it says.

The turbulence in the former French colony has sparked deep concern among Guinea’s neighbours.

The coup is the second to take place in the region, after Mali, in less than 13 months.

The region’s bloc, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), is demanding that elections be held within six months, as well as Conde’s release.

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Guinea junta chief to be sworn in Friday as interim president

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The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa's most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Alpha Conde. AFP

Mamady Doumbouya, a special forces colonel who led a coup in the West African state of Guinea on September, will be sworn in as interim president on Friday, the authorities say.

Doumbouya will be sworn in at noon (1200 GMT) at the Mohammed V conference centre in the capital Conakry, a communique read late Wednesday on national television said.

He will become transitional president, serving before the country returns to civilian rule, according to a blueprint unveiled by the junta on Monday that does not mention a timeline.

The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa’s most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Alpha Conde.

ALSO READ:   Catalan President seeks unity among Independence supporters

Conde became Guinea’s first democratically elected president in 2010 and was re-elected in 2015.

But last year he pushed through a controversial new constitution that allowed him to run for a third term in October 2020.

The move sparked mass demonstrations in which dozens of protesters were killed. Conde won re-election but the political opposition maintained the poll was a sham.

The “charter” unveiled on Monday vows that a new constitution will be drafted and “free, democratic and transparent” elections held, but does not spell out how long the transition will last.

The document says the transitional president will be “head of state and supreme chief of the armed forces… (and) determines the policies of the Nation,” with the power to name and fire an interim prime minister.

ALSO READ:   Uganda slams US over attempted visit to confined opposition leader

However, the president will be barred from being a candidate at the elections that will take place after the transition, it says.

The turbulence in the former French colony has sparked deep concern among Guinea’s neighbours.

The coup is the second to take place in the region, after Mali, in less than 13 months.

The region’s bloc, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), is demanding that elections be held within six months, as well as Conde’s release.

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