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FG says — PDP is a threat to Nigeria’s democracy

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The federal government says the kind of politics being played by the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) constitutes a threat to the nation’s democracy.

Addressing state house correspondents at the presidential villa in Abuja on Wednesday, Lai Mohammed, minister of information, said the PDP and Atiku Abubakar, its presidential candidate, were doing everything possible to sabotage President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration.

He said the opposition party and its presidential candidate are not just overheating the polity but seeking to make Nigeria ungovernable, “especially through their public utterances and their poorly-thought-out press releases before and after the 2019 general election”.

“The federal government has strongly decried the increasingly unpatriotic and desperate opposition politics being played by the PDP and its presidential candidate, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, warning that such dead-end opposition could be toxic for the nation’s democracy, if left unchecked,” he said.

“Never in the history of politics in Nigeria has an opposition party and its presidential candidate exhibited the kind of desperate tactics being deployed by the duo of the PDP and its flag-bearer, especially since President Muhammadu Buhari overwhelmingly defeated Atiku to win the 2019 presidential election.

“Either by themselves or via their proxies, the PDP and its presidential candidate are doing everything possible to sabotage the Buhari administration, generally overheat the polity and make Nigeria seemingly ungovernable. Unless they quickly retrace their steps, they may, sooner than later, overreach themselves.

“For those who may be quick to accuse the government of crying wolf, the pre-election statement credited to the former vice-president, that unless Nigerians vote out the APC Administration, killings by herdsmen will continue and ultimately spark a series of ethno-religious crises that will be irreversible, is looking more like a Freudian slip than anything else.

“Also, in recent times, the PDP has taken its desperation to a new low by attacking the judiciary, an action many see as indicating a reversal of the party’s hitherto self-assured stance that it has a solid case against the election of the President. And either by coincidence or orchestration, a faceless group emerges from nowhere calling for an overthrow of a democratically-elected government, a totally egregious act of treason.

“It beggars belief that a candidate who prides himself as a democrat can so allow desperation to becloud his sense of propriety to such a extent that he will be associating with anti-democratic forces or making inflammatory statements. For acclaimed democrats, there are acceptable channels of seeking redress after an election defeat. Even President Buhari himself went to court three times to challenge election results.

“What is not acceptable is to either resort to self help after an election defeat, or to embark on a journey of subterfuge and sabotage while also mounting a legal challenge or pretending to do so. Worst still, painting the judiciary bad for whatever reason is anti-democratic and unconscionable.

“We want to urge the main opposition party to stop beating the drums of war concentrate on the legal challenge by its candidate against the election of President Buhari if indeed they have any faith in the country’s judiciary, and desist from unnecessarily overheating the polity.”

source — TheCable

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Politics

Sudan’s military asks premier to form new government

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Tensions have risen in recent days between military and civilian members of the Sudanese transitional authority over the coup attempt last month.

Military members of Sudan’s ruling Sovereign Council asked Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok to form a new government to solve the marginalization crisis of tribes, local media reported Wednesday.

According to daily al-Sudani, unidentified informed sources said military members from the Council refused on Tuesday to meet a ministerial committee formed by Hamdok to address the crisis in eastern Sudan.

“The military members refused to meet the ministerial committee and asked to meet Hamdok alone before meeting any minister,” said the newspaper.

It also said members representing the army exerted pressure on Hamdok to dissolve the government in response to demands to form a new government by the head of the High Council of Beja, Muhammad al-Amin Turk.

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Tensions have risen in recent days between military and civilian members of the Sudanese transitional authority over the coup attempt last month.

The government has yet to comment on developments mentioned by the newspaper.

The Sudanese Council of Ministers decided Tuesday to form a committee, headed by Hamdok, to engage military members of the Sovereign Council to agree on “practical solutions” to the crisis.

Sudan is ruled by a civilian government and a Sovereign Council which consists of 14 members; five military representatives from the army, six civilians from the Forces for Freedom and Change Coalition and three members who were added in February to represent armed groups after a peace deal was signed with the government in October 2020.

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Demonstrators have since Sept. 17 blocked Khartoum’s airport, seaports and the main road between Khartoum and Port Sudan in protest of the peace deal with rebel groups, which Beja tribes in eastern Sudan say marginalizes the community.

The High Council of Beja Nazir has complained about marginalization in eastern regions and demanded the cancelation of the peace deal and the establishment of a national conference to approve development projects in the regions.

Since Aug. 21, 2019, Sudan has been in a 53-month transitional period that will end with elections in early 2024.

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Guinea coup leader sworn in as transitional leader

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The new interim president spoke of his "commitment" that neither he nor any member of the junta would stand in any future elections that the military have promised to organise after a transition period.

Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, who led last month’s coup in Guinea, was sworn in as interim president on Friday promising to respect all the West African state’s international commitments.

Doumbouya, who led the overthrow of president Alpha Conde on September 5, was sworn in by Supreme Court head Mamadou Sylla for a transition period of unspecified length.

The new interim president spoke of his “commitment” that neither he nor any member of the junta would stand in any future elections that the military have promised to organise after a transition period.

He said nothing at the time of his swearing in, by the supreme court head, about the duration of this transition.

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– ‘Consolidate democracy’ –

Wearing a beige dress uniform, red beret and dark glasses, the new national leader also vowed to “loyally preserve national sovereignty” and to “consolidate democratic achievements, guarantee the independence of the fatherland and the integrity of the national territory”.

The ceremony was held at the Mohammed-V palace in Conakry on the eve of a public holiday celebrating the 1958 declaration of independence from France.

Doumbouya will serve as transitional president until the country returns to civilian rule, according to a blueprint unveiled by the junta on Monday that does not mention a timeline.

The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa’s most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Conde.

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Conde became Guinea’s first democratically elected president in 2010 and was re-elected in 2015.

But last year he pushed through a controversial new constitution that allowed him to run for a third term in October 2020.

The move sparked mass demonstrations in which dozens of protesters were killed. Conde won re-election but the political opposition maintained the poll was a sham.

The “charter” unveiled on Monday vows that a new constitution will be drafted and “free, democratic and transparent” elections held, but does not spell out how long the transition will last.

The document says the transitional president will be “head of state and supreme chief of the armed forces… (and) determines the policies of the Nation,” with the power to name and fire an interim prime minister.

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However, the president will be barred from being a candidate at the elections that will take place after the transition, it says.

The turbulence in the former French colony has sparked deep concern among Guinea’s neighbours.

The coup is the second to take place in the region, after Mali, in less than 13 months.

The region’s bloc, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), is demanding that elections be held within six months, as well as Conde’s release.

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Guinea junta chief to be sworn in Friday as interim president

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The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa's most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Alpha Conde. AFP

Mamady Doumbouya, a special forces colonel who led a coup in the West African state of Guinea on September, will be sworn in as interim president on Friday, the authorities say.

Doumbouya will be sworn in at noon (1200 GMT) at the Mohammed V conference centre in the capital Conakry, a communique read late Wednesday on national television said.

He will become transitional president, serving before the country returns to civilian rule, according to a blueprint unveiled by the junta on Monday that does not mention a timeline.

The September 5 coup, the latest bout of turbulence in one of Africa’s most volatile countries, saw the overthrow of 83-year-old president Alpha Conde.

ALSO READ:   PDP hits Lai Mohammed Over Comment on national security

Conde became Guinea’s first democratically elected president in 2010 and was re-elected in 2015.

But last year he pushed through a controversial new constitution that allowed him to run for a third term in October 2020.

The move sparked mass demonstrations in which dozens of protesters were killed. Conde won re-election but the political opposition maintained the poll was a sham.

The “charter” unveiled on Monday vows that a new constitution will be drafted and “free, democratic and transparent” elections held, but does not spell out how long the transition will last.

The document says the transitional president will be “head of state and supreme chief of the armed forces… (and) determines the policies of the Nation,” with the power to name and fire an interim prime minister.

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However, the president will be barred from being a candidate at the elections that will take place after the transition, it says.

The turbulence in the former French colony has sparked deep concern among Guinea’s neighbours.

The coup is the second to take place in the region, after Mali, in less than 13 months.

The region’s bloc, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), is demanding that elections be held within six months, as well as Conde’s release.

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